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Error with the Contour (Spatial Analyst) tool in ArcGIS

Error with the Contour (Spatial Analyst) tool in ArcGIS


I am having an issue with the Contour (Spatial Analyst) tool in ArcGIS. When I manually run the tool in ArcToolbox, it will sometimes say that the tool has failed, giving the following error message:

ExecuteError: ERROR 010157: Unable to open feature class F:2014data83c15_contour.shp Failed to execute (Contour).

The strange part is that when I go to the output location of the tool the shapefile is there, and I can open it in ArcMap without an issue.

When I use Python to run the tool, I receive the same error message, and I can't figure out why. This is the loop I have that is meant to convert a list of DEM files into contour shapefiles:

for dem_file in dem_files: file_split = dem_file.split("_") file_name = job_folder + "" + file_split[0] + "_contour.shp" arcpy.sa.Contour(dem_file, file_name, contour_interval)

When I run the script, I can go to the output location and bring the shapefile into ArcMap, even though there was an error. So I don't think this is an issue with my code because it also happens when I run the tool manually. Does anyone know how I can work around this error?


Try putting the output shapefile in a different folder - such as C: emp est_083c15_contour.shp. I think you might be having problems because 1 of your folders is named with a leading number or your output shapefile is named with a leading number.


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All transactions happen in a specific place, which influences customer preferences and behavior. Use ArcGIS technology to understand why transactions happen where they do. Insight from advanced spatial analysis empowers retailers to make informed decisions. Enrich customer experiences, select profitable sites, and increase incremental sales.


Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is a technology critical to the successful management and completion of Land Development projects. Integrating spatial data, software and hardware with skilled professionals, enables the detailed analysis of opportunities, constraints and potential impacts at any scale. GIS has now become an integral tool for the management of complex environmental challenges and for the planning and daily management of project progress.

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  • Environmental mapping – flora and fauna surveys and mapping GPS and GIS data capture thematic mapping using ground-truthed data
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  • Spatial GIS Data management and analysis – digitising, data conversion, rectification, conversions, transformation and projection undertaking location, linear, area and volume analysis
  • Predictive modelling – catchment modelling, slope and flooding risk analysis, noise and odour modelling, lot yields
  • 3D modelling – digital terrain models, contour generation and groundwater mapping, 3D rendering, conceptualisation and fly-throughs
  • Remote sensing – thermal imaging for industrial areas, private households and environmental fluxes multispectral imaging for broad-area surface analysis
  • Aerial photography – full colour and hyperspectral in various resolutions ancillary data including contours and building footprints
  • Interactive mapping – fully manipulable digital maps that users can view with free mapping software such as Google Earth any data that can be represented on a traditional map can be represented interactively (including 3D models)
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360 Environmental supports a wide range of environmental, engineering and development projects and the diverse nature of 360 Environmental’s business means that GIS implementations range from small mapping exercises to large planning and analysis projects for clients in both the public and private sectors.


Assessment

There are two written exams in this course (a midterm and a final), lab exercises, and a final project that includes a project proposal and final report. Graduate students will have extra questions for the lab and the exams, and higher standard for the final project outcomes. The exams are used to assess your understanding of the basic concepts discussed in the lecture, and the format of the exams will consist of a combination of multiple choice, short answer and short essay questions.

The purpose of the final project is to provide experiences for students to apply the methods and tools learned from this class to real-world spatial problems. Topics of the final project could be related to the spatial aspect of a thesis or another course work. The proposal associated with the final project should include a clear description of the proposed problems with appropriate background literature justifying the motivation, description of the collected data sources, and methodology adopted to address the problem. When the project proposal is due, students are expected to have collected the necessary data at hand. The final project will require a presentation of about 6-10 mins PechaKucha style or a poster session, and a final project report. Students are encouraged to start thinking of project ideas early in the semester, and communicate them with the instructor and the TA for feedback and comments.


GIS Consulting Guidelines

Services Provided

Our role is to facilitate your geospatial analysis within the realm of our supported software packages (i.e., ArcMap, ArcGIS Pro, QGIS, ArcGIS Online, and ArcGIS StoryMaps). We can assist you with issues that you may encounter with respect to data finding (locating geospatial data), preparation (importing, merging, and cleaning data), analysis (geoprocessing), and results (understanding the formatting of the output). We can also help you select the best package for your task, interpret error messages, and locate documentation and further resources.

In addition to providing regularly scheduled software-specific tutorials, we can also help instructors by providing classroom presentations to introduce geospatial software.

Our role is to assist you with your analysis, rather than to conduct analyses for you. It is the researcher's responsibility to ensure that the research design, analysis, and programming are justified and appropriate for the discipline at hand.

Whom We Can Help

Types of Assistance Not Covered by our Service

One-on-one GIS/mapping tutoring and general inquiries about methodology and statistical topics

Assistance with projects of commercial nature or those involving classified information, non-disclosure agreements, related to or likely to be involved in litigation, etc.


Free Geography Tools

Exploring the world of free tools for GIS, GPS, Google Earth, neogeography, and more.

The Big List Of GeoStatistical / GeoSpatial Analysis Software III &ndash R to Z

Descriptions come from the software’s website or documentation. I’ll probably put biologically-oriented software in a separate series. Click on the program title to go to its website.

R … free software environment for statistical computing and graphics

Some links for geographically-related R resources and software:

CRAN page on spatial analysis modules for R – Good place to start looking for specific modules.

Regional Crime Analysis Geographic Information System (RCAGIS)

The US Department of Justice Criminal Division GIS Staff, in conjunction with the Baltimore county Police department and the RCAS group, has developed a crime analysis system called RCAGIS (Regional Crime Analysis GIS). RCAGIS is an ESRI MapObjects® based system that is designed to facilitate the analysis of crime on a regional basis. RCAGIS also integrates the CrimeStat ® spatial statistics software package developed by Ned Levine and Associates under a grant from the National Institute of Justice. The RCAGIS Crime Analysis System was designed specifically to assist in the analysis of crime incident data across jurisdictional boundaries.

Note: Requires ESRI MapObjects to be installed, and no longer under development.

Repast Simphony

Repast Simphony is a free and open source agent-based modeling toolkit that simplifies model creation and use … including 2D and 3D Geographical Information Systems (GIS) support

SANET: Spatial Analysis On Networks

SANET is a toolbox for analyzing events that occur on networks or alongside networks e.g., car crashes on roads and beauty parlors in downtown streets, respectively. Networks may be roads, rivers, pipe-lines, cables, etc. The user is supposed to use SANET for academic and educational purposes only.

SaTScan

  • Perform geographical surveillance of disease, to detect spatial or space-time disease clusters, and to see if they are statistically significant.
  • Test whether a disease is randomly distributed over space, over time or over space and time.
  • Evaluate the statistical significance of disease cluster alarms.
  • Perform repeated time-periodic disease surveillance for early detection of disease outbreaks.

SGeMS

The Stanford Geostatistical Modeling Software (SGeMS) is an open-source computer package for solving problems involving spatially related variables. It provides geostatistics practitioners with a user-friendly interface, an interactive 3-D visualization, and a wide selection of algorithms.

Space-Time Analysis of Regional Systems (STARS)

Space-Time Analysis of Regional Systems (STARS) is an open source package designed for the analysis of areal data measured over time. STARS brings together a number of recently developed methods of space-time analysis into a user-friendly graphical environment offering an array of dynamically linked graphical views. It is intended to be used as an exploratory data analysis tool. STARS can also be used from the command line to support more flexible and specialized types of analyses by advanced users. As such STARS should appeal to a wide array of users. Written entirely in Python, STARS is crossplatform and easy to install (and expand).

Note: Alternate homepage link is given on the main page, but it leads to a page informing you that you don’t have Java 1.4.2 installed. Status of this program is unclear.

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA)

Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is free software that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem solving environment. These tools include integrated modules for visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision analysis

Spatial Analysis Utilities

S.A.U. was developed for archaeological intersite studies. However archaeology is not the only discipline that study point distribution maps. This tool will help everybody that has to deal with point pattern analysis.

STEM: The Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeler Project

The Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeler (STEM) tool is designed to help scientists and public health officials create and use spatial and temporal models of emerging infectious diseases. These models can aid in understanding and potentially preventing the spread of such diseases.

VESPER: VARIOGRAM ESTIMATION AND SPATIAL PREDICTION PLUS ERROR

VESPER is a PC-Windows program developed by the Australian Centre for Precision Agriculture (ACPA) for spatial prediction that is capable of performing kriging with local variograms (Haas, 1990). Kriging with local variograms involves searching for the closest neighbourhood for each prediction site, estimating the variogram from the neighbourhood, fitting a variogram model to the data and predicting the value and its uncertainty. The local variogram is modelled in the program by fitting a variogram model automatically through the nonlinear least-squares method. Several variogram models are available, namely spherical, exponential, Gaussian and linear with sill. Punctual and block kriging is available as interpolation options. This program adapts itself spatially in the presence of distinct differences in local structure over the whole field.

Note: Nudgeware doesn’t seem to be under development anymore.

WinBASP

The Bonn Archaeological Software Package (BASP) is a non-profit software project for and by archaeologists which has been developed cooperatively since 1973. It now includes more than 70 functions for seriation, clustering, correspondance analysis, and mapping tools for archaeologists working with IBM compatible PC’s under DOS and all versions of Windows.

No longer supported or maintained authors suggest PAST as an alternative.

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Error with the Contour (Spatial Analyst) tool in ArcGIS - Geographic Information Systems

Exercise: Using ArcGIS Help

ArcGIS 's online documentation system should become your best friend while you are learning to use ArcGIS. The documentation is extensive and quite well written, in comparison to most other software applications' documentation. As you are leaning ArcGIS, you should automatically open Help and keep it open until you are finished with your ArcGIS session. One of the biggest differences between those who learn GIS quickly and those who take longer to learn, or never learn, is that the fast learners use Help extensively. The fast learners will be able to teach themselves a tremendous amount the slow learners will struggle a lot, attempt a lot of things through trial-and-error (mostly error) and learn relatively little.

    Start by finding ArcGIS, by navigating through the Start Button on the Windows Task Bar.

A banner will appear showing that ArcGIS is opening..

ArcMap will start with a dialog prompting you to either create a new empty map, a map template, or open an existing map (if you have been using maps previously, they will be listed in the dialog). We won't be working with maps today, so cancel the dialog.

You will see the ArcGIS application window that contains a single window (the Project Window) containing a few icons, a few menu choices, and a few buttons.

    There are several ways of starting ArcGIS 's on-line documentation ("Help") system:

    Open ArcGIS Help by selecting the shortcut for ArcGIS Desktop Help (in the same Windows Start menu location as ArcGIS ).
    ArcGIS help functions like any other Windows help system for other software applications.

The Contents tab contains all of the main topics in ArcGIS Help.

The contents are arranged in a hierarchical order. Each book icon represents an upper-level subject in the documentation. As you open these books, you will see other book icons, which represent subordinate subjects. Each subject contains topics and/or subordinate subjects.

The window at right hand side will show the introduction of that topic. In this exercise, you will see the topic: Displaying tables and know how to operate it within ArcMap.

Using the GIS Dictionary

ArcGIS help comes with a Glossary of terms. The dictionary is linked on the left-hand pane of the help application.

  1. Open the GIS Glossary by clicking on its link. The application will open.

You can find the definition of many different terms by using the GIS dictionary. Browse for a few more terms.

You have just learned how to open ArcGIS help, and how to search for help on a specific topic. The difference between those of you who learn a little or a lot about ArcGIS and GIS will be determined by those of you who learn to use and consult this on-line documentation. If you learn nothing else this quarter, you should learn to use ArcGIS 's Help. You will use online help more in the next lab exercise.


Error with the Contour (Spatial Analyst) tool in ArcGIS - Geographic Information Systems

The eResearch Knowledge Centre (eRKC) within the HSRC employs a group of practitioners and specialists in the areas of information services, geospatial analytics and digital curation who provide knowledge services to enhance the HSRC’s research capability.

The eRKC is looking to appoint a suitably qualified professional to fill the position of a Geospatial Support Analyst. The main responsibilities of this position are to conceptualise potential geographic information systems (GIS) data and solutions for the Social Sciences research conducted in the HSRC and to render such services as required.

The vision of the eRKC is to enhance the HSRC’s research capability through innovative information services, geospatial solutions and digital curation. The mission of the eRKC is to be an informed research enabler that provides innovative knowledge services and access to resources that meet the needs of the HSRC’s research community and its stakeholders. This is achieved by
•managing various resource collections and support the use thereof,
•supporting digital scholarship and providing support for organisation wide processes and requirements,
•supporting geospatial analytics in the HSRC, and
•raising awareness about best practices and building capacity in the HSRC.

Geospatial Support Analyst
Five (5) Year Fixed Term Contract
Office Base: Pretoria
REF: eRKC002

The Geospatial Support Analyst role demands that the incumbent functions as part of the Geospatial Analytics team. The successful candidate will provide support to geospatial analytics staff directly and to HSRC researchers indirectly, contribute to the delivery of client solutions within the desired time frame and to the use of spatial data and solutions in the HSRC.

Geospatial Support Analyst
Five (5) Year Fixed Term Contract
Office Base: Pretoria
REF: eRKC002

The Geospatial Support Analyst role demands that the incumbent functions as part of the Geospatial Analytics team. The successful candidate will provide support to geospatial analytics staff directly and to HSRC researchers indirectly, contribute to the delivery of client solutions within the desired time frame and to the use of spatial data and solutions in the HSRC.

The following are the key responsibilities for the Geospatial Support Analyst position:
•Participate in conceptualising potential geographic information systems (GIS) data and solutions for the Social Sciences research conducted in the HSRC.
•Assist in undertaking spatial data analyses and data conversion.
•Assist in manipulating GIS data to create information products to meet HSRC specific needs.
•Prepare, geocode and convert data for mapping purposes.
•Create and provide fieldwork maps.
•Assist in fieldwork navigation.
•Assist in maintaining the geospatial data catalogue by implementing best practice metadata management standards.
•Assist in developing the collection of geospatial data sets relevant for social sciences use.

Requirements
•Honours degree, with at least 2 years’ experience in the GIS field.
•Working knowledge of ArcGIS (QGIS being an advantage) and Excel.
•Able to work in a team environment, but also be self-motivated, especially to work remotely.
•Proficiency in speaking and writing English.
•Well-developed interpersonal and communication skills to interface effectively with colleagues and internal clients.
•Ability to anticipate needs, take initiative and implement solutions effectively.
•Ability to work under pressure and after hours when needed.
•Knowledge of Geodatabase management
•Experienced with ArcGIS Geoprocessing tools

The HSRC offers a Cost to Council salary package and applicants must be South African citizens. The HSRC is committed to accelerating the improvement in the proportion of its staff who are black, female or disabled.

APPLICATIONS:
In your application, please include:
•A comprehensive CV, a letter of motivation and the details of three recent referees (with telephone and e-mail contact details).
•Please indicate the reference number in the subject line, applications that do not adhere to this, will not be considered.

The HSRC will only consider applications that comply with the above requirements. Applicants may be required to undertake a psychometric test, a written exercise and / or an oral presentation in the competencies required for the position.

Please submit your application on-line at http://hsrc.jb.skillsmapafrica.com

Please note the following:

•Ensure you use Google Chrome or Firefox from a computer or laptop, and not a cell phone
•Only your CV can be uploaded on the first page after you have registered/logged in.
•ALL OTHER DOCUMENTS can be uploaded on the “Document” tab on your profile
•Attachments must be less than 2 MB.
•Should you have any HR enquiries please send your query citing reference number to [email protected]
•Should you experience problems applying online, please send your applications to [email protected] Clearly indicate the reference number in the subject line.
•For further information about the HSRC, advert or the post and not for sending applications please e-mail Dr Gina Weir-Smith on [email protected] You can further consult our website (www.hsrc.ac.za).

Only applications that comply with the listed above requirements will be considered.

Closing date: 1 April 2021. We encourage applicants to submit prior to the closing date. If you do not receive any response from us within eight weeks, please accept that your application was unsuccessful. Only candidates who are interviewed will be advised of the outcome of their application.

The HSRC reserves the right not to make an appointment.

Geospatial Support Analyst
Five (5) Year Fixed Term Contract
Office Base: Pretoria
REF: eRKC002

The Geospatial Support Analyst role demands that the incumbent functions as part of the Geospatial Analytics team. The successful candidate will provide support to geospatial analytics staff directly and to HSRC researchers indirectly, contribute to the delivery of client solutions within the desired time frame and to the use of spatial data and solutions in the HSRC.

The following are the key responsibilities for the Geospatial Support Analyst position:
•Participate in conceptualising potential geographic information systems (GIS) data and solutions for the Social Sciences research conducted in the HSRC.
•Assist in undertaking spatial data analyses and data conversion.
•Assist in manipulating GIS data to create information products to meet HSRC specific needs.
•Prepare, geocode and convert data for mapping purposes.
•Create and provide fieldwork maps.
•Assist in fieldwork navigation.
•Assist in maintaining the geospatial data catalogue by implementing best practice metadata management standards.
•Assist in developing the collection of geospatial data sets relevant for social sciences use.

Requirements
•Honours degree, with at least 2 years’ experience in the GIS field.
•Working knowledge of ArcGIS (QGIS being an advantage) and Excel.
•Able to work in a team environment, but also be self-motivated, especially to work remotely.
•Proficiency in speaking and writing English.
•Well-developed interpersonal and communication skills to interface effectively with colleagues and internal clients.
•Ability to anticipate needs, take initiative and implement solutions effectively.
•Ability to work under pressure and after hours when needed.
•Knowledge of Geodatabase management
•Experienced with ArcGIS Geoprocessing tools

The HSRC offers a Cost to Council salary package and applicants must be South African citizens. The HSRC is committed to accelerating the improvement in the proportion of its staff who are black, female or disabled.

APPLICATIONS:
In your application, please include:
•A comprehensive CV, a letter of motivation and the details of three recent referees (with telephone and e-mail contact details).
•Please indicate the reference number in the subject line, applications that do not adhere to this, will not be considered.

The HSRC will only consider applications that comply with the above requirements. Applicants may be required to undertake a psychometric test, a written exercise and / or an oral presentation in the competencies required for the position.

Please submit your application on-line at http://hsrc.jb.skillsmapafrica.com

Please note the following:

•Ensure you use Google Chrome or Firefox from a computer or laptop, and not a cell phone
•Only your CV can be uploaded on the first page after you have registered/logged in.
•ALL OTHER DOCUMENTS can be uploaded on the “Document” tab on your profile
•Attachments must be less than 2 MB.
•Should you have any HR enquiries please send your query citing reference number to [email protected]
•Should you experience problems applying online, please send your applications to [email protected] Clearly indicate the reference number in the subject line.
•For further information about the HSRC, advert or the post and not for sending applications please e-mail Dr Gina Weir-Smith on [email protected] You can further consult our website (www.hsrc.ac.za).

Only applications that comply with the listed above requirements will be considered.

Closing date: 1 April 2021. We encourage applicants to submit prior to the closing date. If you do not receive any response from us within eight weeks, please accept that your application was unsuccessful. Only candidates who are interviewed will be advised of the outcome of their application.


Watch the video: interpolation Analysis Using ArcGIS